12 Succulents for the Home

For the Home

Succulents can add interest and personality when used as decor throughout your home. There are so many ways to style them—you can plant a succulent in almost any container. In this article, we will create twelve unique succulent projects that can be used in and around your home from materials you may already have on hand.
It’s really important to keep in mind that succulents do best in bright but not harsh direct light. Find a place in your home where your plants will receive plenty of light throughout the day. If your plants do not receive adequate light, they could become leggy as they stretch toward the sun.

SUCCULENTS IN TEACUPS

SUCCULENTS IN TEACUPS

Planting succulents in your old teacups is a fun and easy way to freshen up a classic piece of kitchenware. Most people have at least a couple of teacups in the cupboard and if not, you can find them relatively cheap at most thrift stores. The options are almost endless:

Add a few teacup succulents to your kitchen window to create an indoor teacup garden. Need a last-minute gift idea? Grab a teacup, plant a small succulent in it, and voila! If you are new to gardening or crafting with succulents, this is a great project to start with.

WHAT YOU NEED

  • Teacup
  • Pebbles
  • Soil
  • Succulents
  • Moss (Optional)

WHAT TO DO

  • Pour a layer of pebbles into your teacup. About an inch or so should be plenty.
Pour a layer of pebbles into your teacup. About an inch or so should be plenty.
  • Fill your teacup about 3⁄4 full with well-draining cactus/succulent soil.
Fill your teacup about 3⁄4 full with well-draining cactus/succulent soil.
  • Use your fingers to push the soil up against the sides of the teacup, creating a hole in the middle of the soil for the plant’s roots to fit into.
Use your fingers to push the soil up against the sides of the teacup, creating a hole in the middle of the soil for the plant’s roots to fit into.
  • Carefully hold your plant sideways by its base and slide it out of its current container. Remove any excess soil from the roots. Try your best not to handle the leaves of the plant too much as they may be easily scarred.
  • Plant your succulent by setting the roots of the plant into the hole you created, and carefully fill the rest of the teacup with soil. Press the soil down around the stem to secure the plant into position.
the soil down around the stem to secure the plant into position.
  • If desired, plant multiple succulents to create a small arrangement within that teacup.

CARE INSTRUCTIONS

Teacups do not have proper drainage holes, so be careful not to overwater your succulents. Stick a finger down into the soil to be sure the soil is completely dry before each watering.

Add pebbles or moss to the top of your soil to give your arrangement a finished look.

SUCCULENTS IN PAINTED MASON JARS

SUCCULENTS IN PAINTED MASON JARS

Mason jars are being used more than ever in crafting and decor because they are so easy to customize. If you don’t have any jars on hand, it’s easy to find them at grocery or home stores nowadays. Whether you are repurposing an old jar or using a brand-new one, Mason jars lend a vintage, upcycled feel to your home.

WHAT YOU NEED

  • Mason Jar
  • Paint
  • Foam Paintbrush
  • Sandpaper or Nail File
  • Pebbles
  • Soil
  • Succulents

WHAT TO DO

  1. Hold your Mason jar upside down—place your hand inside the jar if you can. With your other hand, paint the jar in your desired color using vertical strokes. You may need to apply a couple of coats depending on how thick your paint is. Allow your paint to dry completely between coats.
  2.  If you want your jars to have a distressed look to them, use your sandpaper or nail file to gently remove some of the paint where the jar would most likely get worn over time.
  3. Prepare your jar for planting. Start by adding an inch or two of pebbles followed by your soil. Make sure to leave enough room for the roots of your plant to fit into the jar.
  4.  Plant your succulents. Create a little hole in the soil for your plant to fit into. Place your plant in the jar and cover the roots with soil.
CARE INSTRUCTIONS

CARE INSTRUCTIONS

Since Mason jars do not have proper drainage, take care not to overwater the succulents in them. Stick a finger down into the soil to be sure the soil is completely dry before each watering.

Try wrapping your jars with jute twine for a natural, earthy feel or get fancy by using burlap and lace! Screw on the jar’s open lid for an extra touch if desired.

SUCCULENTS IN WINE CORKS

SUCCULENTS IN WINE CORKS

Using wine corks as decor is an inexpensive (possibly even free) way to add some sophistication to your home or event. You can upcycle your used wine corks or purchase unused corks at a craft store. Cork planters create a cute and classy way to display tiny plants you’ve propagated yourself. These make great favors for your next wine-tasting party or book club!

WHAT YOU NEED

  • Wine Corks
  • Drill
  • 1⁄4″ Drill Bit
  • Soil
  • Pencil or similar pointy tool
  • Baby Succulents

WHAT TO DO

  • Drill a hole as deep into your cork as possible without drilling all the way through.
Drill a hole as deep into your cork as possible without drilling all the way through.
  • Fill the hole with succulent soil.
  • Choose a small succulent to plant in your cork.
  • Use a pencil or other long pointy tool to create a hole in your soil for the stem and roots of your plant to fit into.
  • Plant your succulent!

CARE INSTRUCTIONS

Keep your cork planters in bright indirect sunlight and water every couple of days. Only a small amount of soil will fit in your cork, so it will dry out quickly.

Get creative and add interest to your wine cork planters by gluing moss to the tops, or create cute hanging planters by adding magnetic strips to the backs. You might even use them as little centerpieces by tying multiple cork planters together with twine!

SUCCULENTS IN WINE CORKS 1

SUCCULENT TERRARIUM

SUCCULENT TERRARIUM

Terrariums come in all shapes and sizes and make a stunning design element in your home or office. Really, any open glass container can be used as a succulent terrarium. Whether you choose a bowl, geometric shape, or glass bubble, your succulent terrarium will make a huge impact. You can find interesting terrariums at World Market, Urban Outfitters, or stores online. In this project, I added a cactus, another type of succulent.

WHAT YOU NEED

  • Glass Container
  • Rocks or Pebbles
  • Activated Charcoal
  • Sphagnum Moss
  • Soil
  • Succulents
  • Sand (Optional)
  • Decorative Accessories
  • Spoon, Tweezers, Straw (Optional)

WHAT TO DO

  • Start by lining the bottom of the terrarium with rocks or pebbles and a thin layer of activated charcoal. Since succulents prefer containers with good drainage, the pebbles will create a space for water to drain out of the soil. This will keep the plants’ roots from sitting in excess water and will prevent rot. The activated charcoal acts as a filter for the soil and water. It can freshen the air in the terrarium, which is especially useful if your container has a small opening, and it can also draw bacteria from your soil and water.
SUCCULENT TERRARIUM 1
  • Add a layer of sphagnum moss between your pebbles and soil to prevent the soil from running down into the rocks over time. Sphagnum moss will also assist in creating an alternative drainage system, providing a place for water to escape from the soil.
  • Mix a few tablespoons of activated charcoal with your well-draining soil and add the soil mixture to the terrarium.
  • Decide which plants you would like to use for your terrarium. If you are using cuttings, make sure to take them a few days prior to making your terrarium. To avoid rot, you will want to give the ends time to dry out and callus over before planting them in soil.
  • Begin adding plants and decorations to your terrarium. You may want to use sand on top of the soil for aesthetic value. Depending on the size of the opening of your terrarium, you may find it easier to add the sand before the plants. If you plant your succulents first, use a spoon to pour the sand around the plants.
  • Next, add any decorative moss, pebbles, and twigs you want. If the opening on your terrarium is quite small, you can use tweezers to add moss to the areas where your fingers can’t reach. Use a straw to gently blow sand and soil off of the plants and glass.

CARE INSTRUCTIONS

Place your terrarium in indirect sunlight. Glass magnifies light and heat, so be careful not to place your terrarium where it will receive a lot of direct sunlight. Stick a finger down into the soil to be sure the soil is completely dry before each watering.

A terrarium is usually a sealable glass container used to create a small-scale ecosystem for plants. When creating a succulent terrarium, though, you will want to find a container that is open to the atmosphere. Succulents should be planted in open containers since they prefer low humidity and dry soil, as opposed to the moist environment a closed terrarium provides.

SUCCULENTS IN DECORATED TERRA COTTA POTS

SUCCULENTS IN DECORATED TERRA COTTA POTS

Terra cotta pots are readily available and are an inexpensive option for holding succulents. They come in many different sizes—from itty bitty for your baby plants to large enough to hold a gorgeous arrangement of multiple succulents. I love how they become aged over time, creating a rustic and unique look for each individual pot. There are countless ways to decorate terra cotta pots, but using paint, jute twine, and lace are three of my favorites!

WHAT YOU NEED

  • Terra Cotta Pots
  • Outdoor Paint
  • Paintbrush
  • Scissors
  • Lace
  • Jute Twine
  • Hot Glue
  • Soil
  • Succulents

WHAT TO DO

  • To paint your terra cotta pots: There are different ways to go about painting pots:
  • I find it easiest to use spray paint when I want to paint an entire pot. You may also tape off designs when using spray paint as well.
  • You can also paint them with a paintbrush.
  • You might also like to try dipping your pots in paint. Simply open a gallon of paint and dip your pots. You’ll need to use a paintbrush to remove any excess paint and let the paint drip off into the paint container. Once all of the excess paint has dripped off, set your pots aside to dry. The paint is pretty thick when you use the dipping technique, so you may want to hang your pots to dry if possible.
  • To add lace: Once the paint is completely dry, add lace to the rim. Cut a strip of lace to fit around the upper rim of your pot and use hot glue to hold it in place.
  • To add jute twine: Hot-glue the twine to your pot as you wrap it around to keep the jute in place. You can wrap your entire pot or just part of it.
  • Once you’ve decorated the pots to your liking, fill them with well-draining soil and plant your succulents in them. You can plant one plant in each pot or create arrangements with multiple succulents.

CARE INSTRUCTIONS

Place your decorated pots in a place where they will receive bright, indirect sunlight throughout the day. Water when the soil is completely dry.

SUCCULENT ADDRESS PLAQUE

SUCCULENT ADDRESS PLAQUE

First impressions are lasting, so what better way to welcome guests into your home than with a beautiful succulent address plaque? Your visitors will know they’re in the right place when they see your house number, and they will immediately be greeted by a stunning arrangement of fresh, eye-catching succulents. They won’t believe you when they find out you “did it yourself”!

WHAT YOU NEED

  • 14″ × 11″ Pine Wood
  • Plaque
  • Two pieces of 0.25″ × 3″ × 9.5″ Pine Craft Wood
  • Two pieces of 0.25″ × 3.25″ × 3″ Pine Craft
  • Wood
  • Staple Gun and 1⁄2″ (12mm) Heavy-Duty
  • Staples
  • Drill (Optional)
  • Tape Measure
  • Pencil
  • Hammer
  • Finishing Nails
  • Wood Glue
  • Cloth or Towel
  • Outdoor Spray Paint or
  • Stain
  • Frame Hangers
  • Address Numbers
  • Plastic Wrap
  • Soil
  • Succulents

WHAT TO DO

  • You can make the planting box whatever dimensions you want, depending on how much room you want the succulent box to take up on the plaque. For these instructions, I’ll show you how to make what’s shown in the photo.
  • Staple your 3.25" × 3" wood pieces to the ends of your 3" × 9.5" rectangular wood pieces to create the sides of your succulent box. (Since you’re using craft wood, the staples from a staple gun will go right through it.) The plaque itself will be the back side of the box.
  • If you want your succulent box to have drainage holes, drill them now. (If, for some reason, you don’t want water draining under your plaque, don’t drill the holes.)
  • Flip your 14" × 11" wood plaque over so that the back is facing up. We are going to trace the outline of the succulent box on the back of the plaque so we can hammer in the nails where the box will go.
  • Position your succulent box and measure it to be sure it is aligned with the edges of the plaque. Holding the box in place, trace around the outside, and then around the inside, of the box with a pencil and then remove the box. Measure again to be sure the lines are aligned with the edges of the plaque.
  • Hammer your finishing nails through the plaque between the inner and the outer lines that you traced. Two nails on the sides, and three across the bottom will suffice.
  • Flip your plaque over so that the front is facing up. You should now have the pointed ends of your finishing nails sticking through in the shape of your succulents box.
  • Apply wood glue to the back edges of your box and press the edges of the box onto the nails.
  • Cover the front of your box with a cloth or towel and lightly hammer the box into the nails until the box sits flush with the plaque.
  • If you’d like, you can now spray-paint your address plaque and planting box with outdoor paint. You can also stain your plaque or paint it with a brush, but I found spray-painting it to be the easiest.
  • Once your paint dries, attach your frame hangers to the back of the plaque. Estimate how much your plaque will weigh with the soil and plants in it and be sure to purchase a hanger that can handle that weight. (Follow the directions that came with your hangers for this.)
  • Now attach your house numbers to the plaque. House numbers come in many different fonts, sizes, colors, and materials. I liked these “floating” numbers with a modern feel, but you can choose anything that matches your style.
  • Line your succulent box with plastic wrap to protect the wood. You can glue it into place if it’s slipping around too much. If you drilled drainage holes, pop holes in the plastic with a pencil or another pointy tool.
  • Fill your succulent box with well-draining succulent soil and plant your succulents. Be sure not to cover your numbers with tall plants.

CARE INSTRUCTIONS

Place your address plaque in bright, indirect sunlight and water when the soil is dry. If your plants grow vertically, by sure to keep them trimmed so they don’t block your house numbers.

LETTER SUCCULENT GARDEN

LETTER SUCCULENT GARDEN

Get personal by creating a custom, letter-shaped succulent garden. Kept horizontally, it will make a lovely centerpiece, or hang it vertically for stunning wall art. First or last name initials are popular choices, or maybe you’d like to create multiple succulent letter gardens to spell out a word, such as “LOVE.” We will be using old pallet wood for this project. Many hardware stores will sell you their old pallets for a few dollars. Old fence wood can also be used.

WHAT YOU NEED

  • Pallet Wood
  • Thin Plywood
  • Tape Measure
  • Saw
  • Staple Gun and Staples
  • Drill
    1⁄4″ Drill Bit
  • Sandpaper
  • Mesh Wire (Optional)
  • Sphagnum Moss
  • Soil
  • Succulents

WHAT TO DO

  • Choose a letter that you would like to turn into a succulent planter. It can be any letter, but remember that curvy letters will take more skill to create out of wood then straight-sided letters. For frame of reference, my letter here is about 1 foot wide and just over a foot long.
  • If your pallet isn’t already dismantled, you will need to do that at this time. Taking a pallet apart by removing the nails holding it together is no easy task, so you may want to do what I did and just saw the wood directly off the pallet. My pallet had been out in the weather for quite some time and was really brittle. Rather then destroy the wood by prying it apart with a hammer or crowbar, I decided it would be easier to saw off the wood pieces I needed to create the letter while the pallet was still intact.
  • Measure, cut, and staple together the wood pieces that you removed from your pallet to create your letter. These pieces will be the sides of your planter. I stapled my pieces together on the back and sides of the letter so that no staples would be visible from the front.
  • Trace your letter onto the thin plywood. This will serve as the backing for your letter.
  • Cut out your letter with a saw and drill some holes in it to create some drainage.
  • Use your sandpaper to smooth out any really rough edges on the letter backing.
  • Flip your pallet wood letter over so that the front side is down, and staple on your plywood backing.
  • If you plan to hang your letter vertically, now is the time to add your hanging hardware. Follow the instructions included with your specific hardware.
  • Line the bottom with sphagnum moss to create a barrier between the soil and wood.
  • Depending on the size of your letter, whether you will be setting it up horizontally or vertically, and whether you will be using entire plants or cuttings, you may want to staple some wire mesh to the front of your letter. Add the wire before you put soil in, since the soil and cuttings can fit through the wire.
  • Fill the letter with soil.
  • Plant your succulents. Choose a color scheme or a few types of plants, but use different sizes to create visual interest.
  • If your letter is going to be a vertical garden, you will need to let your plants take root for a few weeks before standing it up or hanging it. After a few weeks, gently pull on your plants to see if they come out of the soil easily. If they are not secure in the soil, you may need to wait a few weeks longer.

CARE INSTRUCTIONS

Place your letter garden where it will receive bright but indirect sunlight. If it is being kept vertical, you will need to lay it horizontal when you water. Water when the soil is totally dry and let the water completely drain out before you hang or stand it back up.

SUCCULENT KOKEDAMA

SUCCULENT KOKEDAMA

Kokedama first originated in Japan, where these moss ball string gardens are very popular. Kokedama is a unique and easy way to grow plants in and around your home and garden. Like other vertical gardens, kokedama are visually interesting while saving space at the same time. They make earthy accent pieces to an outdoor gathering—they’re sure to get guests talking!

WHAT YOU NEED

  • Sheet Moss
  • Scissors
  • Soil
  • Bowl of Water
  • Succulent
  • String or Twine

WHAT TO DO

  • Use your scissors to create a circle from your sheet moss. (You can find sheet moss at most garden centers.)
  • Wet your soil, creating a claylike consistency. Use your hands to create a ball with the soil. Squeeze excess water out as you form the ball.
  • Place the ball of soil on your sheet moss. Hold the ball gently in your hands while using your thumbs to create a hole in the top of the ball where you are going to plant your succulent.
  • Plant your succulent in the top of the ball of soil.
  • Wrap your sheet moss around the ball.
  • Tuck the moss under the plant’s lowest leaves.
  • If your circle is too big and you have too much moss, simply cut away the surplus until the moss fits neatly under the leaves at the top.
  • Take your string and begin wrapping the ball in any direction. Your goal is simply to keep the moss together with the soil ball, but you can make it look any way you like aesthetically! Get creative with the way you wrap your moss ball. You can use any color string, rope, twine, yarn, or even leather. Make sure to leave at least 12 inches of string at the beginning and enough string at the end that you can tie the two ends together for hanging once your ball is completely wrapped.
  • Cut the string with your scissors and tie the ends together. Now find a place to hang your kokedama.

CARE INSTRUCTIONS

Hang your kokedama in bright indirect sunlight and soak the ball in water when the soil is dry.

SUCCULENT COLANDER

SUCCULENT COLANDER

Whether you are preparing a meal, helping kids with homework, or simply enjoying a cup of coffee with friends, the kitchen often ends up being the hub of a household. Your succulents will feel right at home in your kitchen when planted in a brightly colored colander.

WHAT YOU NEED

  • Colander
  • Plastic Wrap
  • Hot Glue
  • Pencil or similar pointy tool
  • Pebbles (Optional)
  • Soil
  • Succulents
  • Decorative Sand

WHAT TO DO

  • Start by lining your colander with some plastic. Secure it in place with hot glue. You don’t want your soil escaping through all the holes!
  • Use a sharpened pencil to poke a couple of holes in your plastic where there are already holes in the colander. This will create a way for water to drain. (If you don’t want drainage holes for some reason—such as not wanting water to drip out of the bottom onto your kitchen counter—line the bottom of your colander with pebbles and skip this step.)
  • Fill your colander about 3⁄4 full of soil.
  • Begin adding your succulents. As you plant them, add more soil around each plant until the colander is full of plants and soil.
  • Cover your soil with decorative sand if you prefer the look.

CARE INSTRUCTIONS

Place your succulent colander in bright, indirect sunlight and water when the soil is completely dry.

TINY TERRA COTTA MAGNETS

TINY TERRA COTTA MAGNETS

Looking for an adorable way to display your tiniest succulents? Look no further. Tiny terra cotta pots are the cutest way to show off your babies. Itty-bitty pots are charming in their own right, but when paired with darling little succulents, the cuteness factor is off the charts! Add magnets to the back of your pots to hang them on your fridge or around the house on other metal surfaces. These make an adorable gift for a teacher, neighbor, or friend.

WHAT YOU NEED

  • 1⁄2″ Magnets
  • Glue Gun and Glue
  • Tiny Terra Cotta Pots, less than 1″ tall
  • Soil
  • Baby Succulents

WHAT TO DO

  • Use your glue gun to add some glue to one of the magnets.
  • Press the magnet onto one of the mini terra cotta pots.
  • Add soil to the pot and plant a baby succulent in it. Repeat steps 1 through 3 for the remaining pots and plants.

CARE INSTRUCTIONS

Since your tiny pots don’t hold much soil, they need to be watered regularly. Water every few days or when you notice the soil is totally dry. Keep your little pots where they get bright, indirect sunlight if possible. If your pot magnets are on the fridge and your plants start to stretch toward the sun, simply remove the leggy plant and replace it with a new one. These containers are more of a novelty than a permanent home for growing succulents.

Get crafty with your kids by letting them paint some mini pots. They will love adding a touch of personalization and then seeing their little works of art hanging on the fridge!

BIRCH LOG PLANTER

BIRCH LOG PLANTER

Planting succulents in a birch log is a perfect way to add a natural, rustic element to your home. Birchwood is easy to find at most home stores or garden centers. This planter also makes a unique centerpiece for a wedding or event.

WHAT YOU NEED

  • 6″–8″ Tall Birch Log
  • Drill with Blade Bit
  • Plastic Wrap
  • Pebbles
  • Soil
  • Succulents
  • Hot or Floral Glue
  • Moss

WHAT TO DO

  • Use your drill with a blade bit to drill a hole into your log. You want the hole to be big enough for the roots of your plants to fit with some extra soil.
  • Line the hole in your log with plastic to protect the wood from water damage. You may want to glue the plastic into place if it’s slipping around too much.
  • Add a layer of pebbles (for drainage), soil, and your plants.
  • Attach moss to the log with your glue to add the finishing touch.

CARE INSTRUCTIONS

Place your log planter in an area of your home that receives bright but indirect sunlight and a few hours of direct sunlight throughout the day. Water when the soil is completely dry.

Try using this same technique on a variety of logs in and around your home. Drill holes in larger logs to use as planters in your garden.

LIVING WREATH

LIVING WREATH

Add beauty to your home with a breathtaking succulent wreath. It’s also very versatile—you can hang it vertically on your front door, or lay it flat as a centerpiece with a tall candle in the center. Easily customizable, this wreath is sure to be a delight for years to come. It makes a lovely housewarming gift!

WHAT YOU NEED

  • Sphagnum Moss
  • Large Bowl of Water
  • Wreath Frame 13″–15″
  • Jute Twine
  • Scissors
  • Pencil or similar pointy tool
  • Succulent Cuttings
  • Floral Pins
  • Wreath Hanger

WHAT TO DO

  • Soak your sphagnum moss in a large bowl of water.
  • Begin adding your moss to your wreath frame, squeezing out any excess water as you go.
  • As you work your way around the wreath frame, press the moss together as if you are creating a loaf.
  • Once the entire wreath frame is covered with moss, tie the end of the jute twine to the back of the frame and wrap the moss with the twine. This will keep the moss attached to your frame. Once you have gone around the entire frame once or twice, tie off and cut your jute twine.
  • Use your pencil or other pointy tool to create holes in the moss for your succulent cuttings to fit into. Use your floral pins to fasten your cuttings into place if necessary.
  • Work your way around the wreath, arranging plants to suit your liking. I chose to group certain types of plants together. Pick one or two larger plants to serve as visual focal points.
  • Allow plants to dry and root for a few weeks before hanging the wreath vertically with the wreath hanger.

CARE INSTRUCTIONS

Place your wreath where it will get enough sunlight to keep the plants from stretching out and becoming leggy, but not too much direct sunlight, as this can burn your succulent cuttings. Water your wreath by submerging it in water when the sphagnum moss becomes dry. This will probably be about once a week, depending on the weather where you live.

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