6 Best Succulent For Holidays

It’s always exciting to change up your home decor throughout the seasons to coincide with different holidays. Whether you like to go all out or just add a few touches here and there, you can easily incorporate succulents into your holiday decor no matter what time of year it is. In this chapter, we will create six gorgeous succulent projects that will breathe new life into your seasonal favorites. From stunning succulent-topped pumpkins to adorable succulent-filled Easter eggs, you’re sure to fall in love with these charming new traditions.

SUCCULENT-TOPPED PUMPKIN

SUCCULENT-TOPPED PUMPKIN

Succulent-topped pumpkins are a rising trend in fall decor and it’s no wonder why! Succulents come in a variety of colors that look stunning paired with pumpkins of all shapes and sizes. A succulent-topped pumpkin makes an eye-catching centerpiece at an autumn gathering or a perfect accessory for your front porch.

WHAT YOU NEED

  • Pumpkin
  • Floral Glue or Hot Glue
  • Sphagnum Moss
  • Succulent or Succulent Cuttings
  • Scissors

WHAT TO DO

  • Snap the stem off your pumpkin. Pumpkin stems usually pop right off, but if yours is troublesome, you can saw it off.
  • Apply floral or hot glue to the top of your pumpkin.
  • Press your moss onto the glue.
  • Hold your plant upside down and apply floral or hot glue to the lower leaves.
  • Carefully press your plant onto the moss. Repeat steps 4 and 5 if you are using multiple plants.
  • Cut off any sphagnum moss that is out of place.

CARE INSTRUCTIONS

Keep your succulent-topped pumpkin out of direct sunlight. Wet moss thoroughly about once a week. Since the pumpkins are not cut, this project will last months with proper care. When the pumpkin does begin to rot, though, carefully remove your succulents and plant them in well-draining soil.

You can also cut the top off of your pumpkin, scoop out the insides, add soil, and plant whole succulents directly into your pumpkin. Since carved pumpkins rot more quickly, this technique will not last as long as the gluing method.

TOPIARY BALL

TOPIARY BALL

Throughout the year, you may notice a lot of stores carry faux topiary balls to coincide with the different holidays. It’s easy to breathe new life into these artificial topiaries by attaching real succulents to them. You can add different colors, styles, or sizes of plants to take the faux arrangement up a notch. Topiary balls are fantastic year-round!

WHAT YOU NEED

  • Succulent Cuttings
  • Floral Wire (22-gauge)
  • Floral Tape
  • Faux Topiary Ball (with foam center)

WHAT TO DO

  • Wrap the stems of your succulent cuttings with floral wire and leave a couple of inches of wire at the end. I’ve listed 22-gauge floral wire in the materials list, but use something thicker if the stems of your plants are thicker or if your foam ball is hard to penetrate.
  • Wrap the succulent stems with floral tape. Start as close to the base of your plant as possible and wrap until you get to the end of the stem of your plant.
  • Hold your cutting by the stem and insert the tip of the wire into the foam center of your topiary ball. If your succulent sticks out too far, cut the wire shorter and reinsert it into the foam ball. Make sure to sprinkle your succulents evenly throughout the topiary ball.

CARE INSTRUCTIONS

Keep your topiary out of harsh direct sunlight. When your plants begin to wither, remove them from the topiary, remove the floral tape and wire, and plant them in well-draining soil.

GLASS BULB ORNAMENT

GLASS BULB ORNAMENT

Give your Christmas tree a modern flair with a gorgeous air plant–filled glass bulb ornament. (See Article 1 for more information on air plants.) Since air plants do not require soil to survive, your ornament has a clean and stunning simplicity.

WHAT YOU NEED

  • Hanging Glass Bulb Terrarium
  • White Sand
  • Air Plant
  • Faux Holly Berries

WHAT TO DO

  • Pour a thin layer of white sand in the bottom of your glass bulb. The sand is decorative and reminiscent of snow!
  • Insert your air plant into the bulb. It can rest on top of the sand. Let some of the plant hang out of the opening if you like the look.
  • Add some faux holly berries for a pop of color.

CARE INSTRUCTIONS

Place your bulb where it will get plenty of bright indirect sunlight. You should remove your air plant about once per week to water it. You can water by rinsing it under running water, or let the entire plant soak in water for about 20 minutes. Let it dry for a few hours before replacing it in the glass bulb.

You can also create a traditional succulent terrarium in a hanging glass bulb!

See “Succulent Terrarium” project in Chapter 3 for more information. Place the terrarium in indirect sunlight. Glass magnifies light and heat, so be careful not to place your terrarium where it will receive a lot of direct sunlight. Stick a finger down into the soil to be sure the soil is completely dry before each watering.

LIVING CHRISTMAS TREE

LIVING CHRISTMAS TREE

A living succulent Christmas tree is a fabulous way to enhance your home for the holidays. Its striking beauty and low maintenance make it an innovative alternative to a traditional Christmas tree. If you are eco-conscious or just love the look of these gorgeous arrangements, a succulent Christmas tree is sure to be your favorite holiday decor tradition for years to come.

WHAT YOU NEED

  • Posterboard or Paper
  • Two Pencils
  • String
  • Scissors
  • Hardware Cloth or Chicken Wire
  • Wire Cutters
  • Tape
  • Yardstick or Measuring Tape
  • Floral Wire
  • Sphagnum Moss
  • Succulent Cuttings
  • Floral Pins

WHAT TO DO

  • Start by creating a circle template out of paper. Depending on how big you want to make your Christmas tree, you may need to use posterboard or tape some pieces of paper together. I used a 24" × 10' piece of silver galvanized steel hardware cloth, so the biggest circle I could make had a 2' diameter.

If you want to make a smaller tree, you can use a pan lid, wreath frame, or other circular item as your template. This will save you time, eliminating the first few steps of this project.

  • Tie your pencils together with string to create a makeshift compass.
  • Hold one pencil in the center of your paper and draw a circle with the other pencil.
  • Roll out your piece of chicken wire or hardware cloth (you can find these at your local home center) and place your paper circle on top of it. If your circle is large you can stand on your paper, or tape it to the wire to hold it in place. (You may want to wear gloves when working with hardware cloth or chicken wire.)
  • Use wire cutters to cut the circle out of your wire or cloth following the template you made.
  • Now you will need to cut a triangle or “slice” out of your wire circle to create a cone. It should look like you removed one slice from a pie. The bigger the slice you remove, the smaller the base of your cone will be. You can try to measure your angle with a yardstick or measuring tape but it’s hard to draw on wire and also difficult to cut a straight line. I used a measuring tape to find the exact center of my wire circle and then began cutting one side of my slice. I cut one vertical wire, moved down a square, cut another vertical wire, moved to the left one square, and cut a horizontal wire. Repeat this pattern until you get to the outer edge of the circle. Go back to the center of the circle and repeat the cutting pattern in reverse to create the other side of your slice.
  • Now that you have removed the slice from your circle (which should now resemble Pac-Man), you can roll your wire into a cone shape. Depending on the thickness of your wire, this may be more difficult than it sounds. You may need to overlap the sides to create a flat surface for your cone to stand on.
  • Once you have rolled your cone into the desired form, secure it into place with floral wire.
  • Turn the cone upside down and fill it with dampened sphagnum moss.
  • If your sphagnum moss wants to fall out of the bottom of your tree, you can use your floral wire to create a barrier across the opening of the cone.
  • Stand your cone up on a flat surface, point up, like a Christmas tree.
  • Begin planting your succulent cuttings in the tree. If you find it difficult to insert your stems into the moss, use a pencil or other pointy tool to create holes in which to push your stems.
  • Use larger plants toward the bottom of your tree and small cuttings toward the top. You can create a pattern with your plants or just insert them randomly. I like the way a swirl pattern grabs your attention and draws your eye around the tree.
  • If your cuttings have short stems or just don’t want to stay on the tree, you can fasten them into place with floral pins.

CARE INSTRUCTIONS

Place your tree in bright, indirect sunlight. Water when the sphagnum moss becomes dry. Be sure to rotate your tree occasionally to allow even sun exposure.

To create a larger tree, try wrapping a tapered tomato cage with chicken wire to serve as your frame!

EGG CRATE

EGG CRATE

Nothing says “Happy Easter” like a crate full of colorful pastel eggs! For a special twist, though, add baby succulents to your Easter decor. Filling an egg crate with succulent-filled eggs creates a perfect springtime centerpiece that you’ll want to keep around long after Easter has come and gone.

WHAT YOU NEED

  • Eggs
  • Succulent Soil
  • Baby Succulents
  • Egg Crate
  • Moss (Optional)
  • Faux Flowers (Optional)

WHAT TO DO

  • Gently crack your eggs near the top and save or discard the egg whites and yolks.
  • Rinse the eggs out with water and let dry.
  • Fill your eggshells with succulent soil. Lightly pack in the soil all the way to the top.
  • Plant your baby succulents in your eggshells. You can plant one larger succulent or a few little ones in each shell.
  • Create a complete arrangement by placing your succulent-filled eggshells into your egg crate. Create interest by leaving some slots empty or by planting a succulent directly into the egg crate.
  • Add moss to empty slots in your crate or around plants to add color and texture to your arrangement.
  • If you like the look, add a couple of faux flowers to enhance the springtime feel.

CARE INSTRUCTIONS

Place your succulent-filled egg crate in bright, indirect sunlight and water when the soil is completely dry.

Use a ceramic egg crate if you intend on planting succulents directly into the crate. Paper cartons will become weak over time as you water your plants and will leak.

EASTER BASKET WREATH

EASTER BASKET WREATH

A lot of Easter decor tends to be over the top when it comes to bright colors, plastic eggs, and gigantic bows. If you are looking for something a little more subtle with a natural, earthy feel, this Easter wreath will be right up your alley.

WHAT YOU NEED

  • Eggs
  • Oval Grapevine Wreath with Basket Bottom
  • Sphagnum Moss
  • Succulents
  • Faux Flowers

WHAT TO DO

  • Gently crack your eggs near the top and save or discard the egg whites and yolks.
  • Rinse the eggs out with water and let dry.
  • Fill the basket of your wreath with sphagnum moss.
  • Arrange your eggs where you want them in the basket, with their intact ends up. I used colorful eggs from my neighbor’s chickens, but you can use white or brown eggs from the store.
  • Plant your succulents in the sphagnum moss. I tried to use plants that matched my eggs and had a pastel, springtime feel!
  • Stick faux flowers into the wreath for a finishing touch.

CARE INSTRUCTIONS

Hang your wreath where it will not receive a lot of harsh direct sunlight. Water when the sphagnum moss becomes dry.

Grapevine wreaths come in many shapes and sizes and can be used for a variety of holidays! Don’t limit yourself to only using this wreath for Easter. You can change out your plants and decor throughout the year to complement every season.

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